A Life Apart

Book Title: A Life Apart
Authors:  L.Y. Marlow
Publisher: Broadway Books
Pub Date: April 22, 2014
Disclaimer: “I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review.”
Genres: Historical Fiction, Romance, Pearl Harbor, Civil Rights, WWII,
Description: From the author of Color Me Butterfly, the poignant story of a decades-long interracial love affair between a white sailor and the sister of the black sailor who saved his life at Pearl Harbor.
When Morris Sullivan joins the navy in 1940, his hopes are high. Though he leaves behind his new wife and their baby daughter, he is thrilled to be pursuing his lifelong dream-only to be shipped off to Pearl Harbor when the war begins. When he narrowly survives the 1941 attack, thanks to the courage of a black sailor he doesn’t know, Morris is determined to seek out the man’s family and express his gratitude and respect. On leave, he tracks down the man’s sister, and finds an immediate, undeniable connection with the nurturing yet fiercely independent Beatrice, who has left the stifling South of her upbringing for the more liberal, integrated north.

Though both try to deny their growing bond, their connection and understanding is everything missing from Morris’s hasty marriage to his high school sweetheart Agnes, and from Beatrice’s plodding life as she grieves the brother she has lost. At once a family epic, and a historical drama that takes readers from World War II through the Civil Rights Movement to the present day, A Life Apart is about a love that creates complicated and unbreakable ties between two families that live worlds apart. L.Y. Marlow brings readers along for the emotional journey as Morris and Beatrice’s relationship is tested by time, family loyalties, racial tensions, death, unending guilt, and the profound effects of war.

My Thoughts:
I enjoy this era a bit. I was keep interest in WWII. I also like the way this book went about differently and how thing got complicated between the father and mother of the book. I also like how a romance happened between a white solider and a black solider sister. You learn about some of the things going on Civil Rights. You see it though his daughters, there mothers. It really is a good book.

My Reviews: Goodreads/Shelfari/LibraryThing/Barnes and Noble

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A Life Apart

Book Title: A Life Apart
Authors:  L.Y. Marlow
Publisher: Broadway Books
Pub Date: April 22, 2014
Disclaimer: “I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review.”
Genres: Historical Fiction, Romance, Pearl Harbor, Civil Rights, WWII,
Description: From the author of Color Me Butterfly, the poignant story of a decades-long interracial love affair between a white sailor and the sister of the black sailor who saved his life at Pearl Harbor.
When Morris Sullivan joins the navy in 1940, his hopes are high. Though he leaves behind his new wife and their baby daughter, he is thrilled to be pursuing his lifelong dream-only to be shipped off to Pearl Harbor when the war begins. When he narrowly survives the 1941 attack, thanks to the courage of a black sailor he doesn’t know, Morris is determined to seek out the man’s family and express his gratitude and respect. On leave, he tracks down the man’s sister, and finds an immediate, undeniable connection with the nurturing yet fiercely independent Beatrice, who has left the stifling South of her upbringing for the more liberal, integrated north.

Though both try to deny their growing bond, their connection and understanding is everything missing from Morris’s hasty marriage to his high school sweetheart Agnes, and from Beatrice’s plodding life as she grieves the brother she has lost. At once a family epic, and a historical drama that takes readers from World War II through the Civil Rights Movement to the present day, A Life Apart is about a love that creates complicated and unbreakable ties between two families that live worlds apart. L.Y. Marlow brings readers along for the emotional journey as Morris and Beatrice’s relationship is tested by time, family loyalties, racial tensions, death, unending guilt, and the profound effects of war.

My Thoughts:
I enjoy this era a bit. I was keep interest in WWII. I also like the way this book went about differently and how thing got complicated between the father and mother of the book. I also like how a romance happened between a white solider and a black solider sister. You learn about some of the things going on Civil Rights. You see it though his daughters, there mothers. It really is a good book.

My Reviews: Goodreads/Shelfari/LibraryThing/Barnes and Noble

The Journal Of Biddy Owens, The Negro Leagues, Birmingham, Alabama, 1948

Title of Book: The Journal Of Biddy Owens, The Negro Leagues, Birmingham, Alabama, 1948
Author: Walter Dean Myers
Genres: Historical Fiction, Sports, Baseball, Children, Young Adult
Series: My Name is America
Publisher:  Scholastic Inc.
Pub Date: April 1, 2001 (192 Pages, Hardcover)
Book Source: Hardcover
Author Contact: Goodread Profile

Synopsis:
Biddy Owens is the batboy for the Birmingham Black Barons, one of the best teams in the Negro Leagues. With a supporting cast of characters that includes some of the greatest players ever, Biddy¹s story covers the games, the grueling road trips, racial segregation, and day-to-day life in Birmingham during this pivotal time in American history.


My Thoughts:
This book is written in the form of a diary. Though This book shows you thing though the eyes of any African American. This book is about the Negro Leagues. It tell about the times where Baseball was still considered  a White man’s game.

Around this time in 1948, Baseball was starting to ingrates with African American. It was when Jackie Robinson was brought to place for the Major Leagues though though out the book. People were still think that there were still a few segregated seating in ballparks. They were still signs for blacks and White signs stating around.

Though this does change though you understand what it like at that time along with baseball changing and other things about american history. You do learn about the different thing though Ameican History and good for young children and adult to understand and learn about that time.

My Reviews: Goodreads / Shelfari

My Rating:

Review: The Journal Of Biddy Owens, Birmingham, Alabama, 1948

Title of Book: The Journal Of Biddy Owens, The Negro Leagues, Birmingham, Alabama, 1948
Author: Walter Dean Myers
Genres: Historical Fiction, Sports, Baseball, Children, Young Adult
Series: My Name is America
Publisher:  Scholastic Inc.
Pub Date: April 1, 2001 (192 Pages, Hardcover)
Book Source: Hardcover
Author Contact: Goodread Profile

Synopsis:
Biddy Owens is the batboy for the Birmingham Black Barons, one of the best teams in the Negro Leagues. With a supporting cast of characters that includes some of the greatest players ever, Biddy¹s story covers the games, the grueling road trips, racial segregation, and day-to-day life in Birmingham during this pivotal time in American history.


My Thoughts:
This book is written in the form of a diary. Though This book shows you thing though the eyes of any African American. This book is about the Negro Leagues. It tell about the times where Baseball was still considered  a White man’s game.

Around this time in 1948, Baseball was starting to ingrates with African American. It was when Jackie Robinson was brought to place for the Major Leagues though though out the book. People were still think that there were still a few segregated seating in ballparks. They were still signs for blacks and White signs stating around.

Though this does change though you understand what it like at that time along with baseball changing and other things about american history. You do learn about the different thing though Ameican History and good for young children and adult to understand and learn about that time.

My Reviews: Goodreads / Shelfari

My Rating:
Other People Reviews:

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